Australia’s Stunning Buildings that Adapt to Environment

by Andrew Michler
Tech Insider, Dec 15, 2015

Image: RMIT University's design hub in Melbourne has an exterior made of sandblasted glass disks, which pivot through the day like vertical blinds to control interior light and heat gain. The facade changes tempo throughout the day; sometimes it's a teal grid in direct daylight, then a more delicate steel blue lace when backlit by the sun. Courtesy Tech Insider, photo by Andrew Michler(Image: RMIT University’s design hub in Melbourne has an exterior made of sandblasted glass disks, which pivot through the day like vertical blinds to control interior light and heat gain. The facade changes tempo throughout the day; sometimes it’s a teal grid in direct daylight, then a more delicate steel blue lace when backlit by the sun. Courtesy Tech Insider, photo by Andrew Michler)

When researching the most interesting sustainable buildings and regions for my book Hyperlocalization of Architecture, I kept ending up in Australia.

From the largest office building in the southern hemisphere to a tiny cabin in the outback, these projects consistently challenge and provoke. They push to the outer edges of environmental architecture.

One of the stand-out features in Australian contemporary building design is a quality of movement — a kind of kinetic design that allows buildings to be adaptable and comfortable. Some buildings open to provide a path for the prevailing cooling breeze, or close to protect from wildfire or prying eyes. Read more…

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